Bridges to Higher Education Bridges to Higher Education

By Stage

Early Stage 1 to Stage 3 – Kindergarten to Year 6

Page title Early Stage 1 to Stage 2
Introduction text Early stage 1 – Kindergarten
Stage 1 – Year 1 and Year 2
Stage 2 – Year 3 and Year 4
Key message

What can I do? I can do anything

Research clearly shows that early childhood is a vital time in a child's development. By actively involving children in educational programs from an early age, we can set them on a pathway for lifelong learning. The Early Years Learning Framework (PDF, 5.53MB) (EYLF),(2013), has been revised to align with Belonging, Being and Becoming (PDF, 722Kb) (2009)— Australia's first national Early Years Learning Framework, outlining these key outcomes:

  1. Children have a strong sense of identity
  2. Children are connected with and contribute to their world
  3. Children have a strong sense of wellbeing
  4. Children are confident and involved learners
  5. Children are effective communicators.

These formative stages are characterised as belonging, begin and becoming to foster students connections to family, community, culture and place. As students participate in everyday school life, they develop interests and construct their own identities and understandings of the world and how they will belong in this world.

Australian National Curriculum general capabilities

The Australian Curriculum includes seven general capabilities:

  • Literacy
  • Numeracy
  • Information and communication technology (ICT) capability
  • Critical and creative thinking
  • Personal and social capability
  • Ethical understanding
  • Intercultural understanding.

General capabilities, a key dimension of the Australian Curriculum, are addressed explicitly in the content of the learning areas.

The general capabilities encompass the knowledge, skills, behaviours and dispositions that, together with curriculum content in each learning area and the cross-curriculum priorities, will assist students to live and work successfully in the twenty-first century.

They complement the key learning outcomes of the Early Years Learning Framework (COAG 2009) – that children have a strong sense of identity and wellbeing, are connected with and contribute to their world, are confident and involved learners and effective communicators.

For more information, access:

NAPLAN

The National Assessment Program – Literacy and Numeracy (NAPLAN) is an annual assessment for students in Years 3, 5, 7 and 9.

For students in Year 3 there are four tests covering numeracy, reading, writing and language conventions (spelling, punctuation and grammar).

More information is available on the Board of Studies website and NAPLAN website.

Progression options and key transition points
  • Readiness for school
  • Core literacy and numeracy development
  • Attendance
  • Engagement and connections
  • Developing social and cultural capital
  • Aspiration
Clusters
Academic preparedness
  • Programs designed to mitigate the disadvantages linked to LSES
  • Direct instruction programs in literacy and numeracy
  • Personalised lesson plans
Motivation, confidence and awareness
  • University outreach programs to raise aspiration and develop discipline interest and key skills
  • Embedded grit development, via effortful, long term tasks in school readiness and personal development programs; sport and hobbies; study skills programs; formal curriculum; and outreach programs
Building school and community capacity
  • Transition programs for school readiness, focusing on cooperation over curricula, and passing on written information about the students
  • Integrated school, community and student-focused interventions, including curriculum reform
  • Building teacher capacity
  • Additional education and social services for vulnerable students
Engaging parents and carers
  • Relationship building between the student, parents, pre-school and primary school
  • Regular contact between parents and teachers
  • Parent development programs, reinforcing parents' self-efficacy and meeting with other families to encourage life-long learning concepts
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples
  • Community reading programs in pre-primary and primary schools which involve local Indigenous adults
  • Direct instruction programs in literacy and numeracy
  • Personalised learning plans
  • Whole-of-school approach to valuing Indigenous knowledge and history
  • Engaging parents and carers via in school and at home reading programs, local-language programs, parent-run, after-school care, online resources and parent-focused capacity-building workshops
Page titleStage 3 - Years 5 and 6
Introduction text

The most common approaches to enabling progression for primary school students involve efforts to ameliorate the effects of disadvantage along multiple axes, such as engagement with parents and community, building teacher capacity, providing additional educational and social services, school curriculum reform, retention and achievement programs, targeted interventions in order to develop key skills, developing grit and resilience in students, and aspiration and transition programs.

A growing number of Australian university-led outreach programs are aimed at primary school students. At present, much of the Australian literature on this topic is focused on individual university led programs rather than systemic approaches or longitudinal outcomes; however, the overseas and local school based evidence is strong that early outreach improves progressing into higher education. Primary school outreach programs have tended to focus on building capacity, aspiration raising, generating interest in specific subjects, and transition. (NCSEHE)

Key message

Engage + Challenge = Choice

It's never too early to start talking about careers and futures.

Link childhood interests with education and careers indirectly, by providing a range of targeted experiences and interactions that stimulate imaginations, challenge conditioning and promote choice.

Australian National Curriculum general capabilities

The Australian Curriculum includes seven general capabilities:

  • Literacy
  • Numeracy
  • Information and communication technology (ICT) capability
  • Critical and creative thinking
  • Personal and social capability
  • Ethical understanding
  • Intercultural understanding.

General capabilities, a key dimension of the Australian Curriculum, are addressed explicitly in the content of the learning areas.

The general capabilities encompass the knowledge, skills, behaviours and dispositions that, together with curriculum content in each learning area and the cross-curriculum priorities, will assist students to live and work successfully in the twenty-first century.

For more information, access:

NAPLAN

The National Assessment Program – Literacy and Numeracy (NAPLAN) is an annual assessment for students in Years 3, 5, 7 and 9. 

For students in Year 5 there are four tests covering numeracy, reading, writing and language conventions (spelling, punctuation and grammar).

More information is available on the Board of Studies website and NAPLAN website.

Progression options and key transition points
  • Readiness for high school transition
  • Knowledge of potential educational and career paths
  • Engagement and connection
  • Developing social and cultural capital
  • Aspiration
Clusters
Academic preparedness
  • Programs designed to mitigate the disadvantages linked to LSES
  • Direct instruction programs in literacy and numeracy
  • Personalised lesson plans
Motivation, confidence and awareness
  • University outreach programs to raise aspiration and develop discipline interest and key skills
  • Embedded grit development, via effortful, long term tasks in school readiness and personal development programs; sport and hobbies; study skills programs; formal curriculum; and outreach programs
Building school and community capacity
  • Transition programs focusing on cooperation over curricula, and passing on written information about the students
  • Integrated school, community and student-focused interventions, including curriculum reform
  • Building teacher capacity
  • Additional education and social services for vulnerable students
Engaging parents and carers
  • Relationship building between the student, parents, primary school and high school
  • Regular contact between teachers and parents
  • Parent development programs:
    • Information about accessing university; 
    • Networking parents and university staff / alumni; 
    • Reinforcing parents' self efficacy; and 
    • Meeting with other families
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples
  • Community reading programs in primary schools which involve local Indigenous adults
  • Direct instruction programs in literacy and numeracy
  • Personalised learning plans
  • A whole of school approach to valuing Indigenous knowledge and history
  • Engaging parents and carers via in school and at home reading programs, local language programs, parent-run after school care, online resources and parent focused capacity building workshops

Stage 4 to Stage 6 – Year 7 to Year 12

Page title Stage 4 - Years 7 and 8
Introduction text

Secondary school transition into higher education remains the most common path for students entering university. It is also the most common stage of pre-university education targeted by university led outreach programs, which focus on increasing the participation in higher education of students from low socio-economic backgrounds, Indigenous students, and regional and remote students.

Sustained, holistic or cumulative programs are considered best practice in increasing students' secondary school achievement and completion, and raising aspiration for further education.

Such programs generally have four main goals related to preparing students for higher education and career paths:

  1. Raising educational aspirations, and improving practical knowledge of career options and university pathways;
  2. Early engagement of students in order to develop their social, personal and cultural capital, and increase their university readiness, resilience and capacity;
  3. Engagement of parents in their children's education, particularly in strengthening parental expectations and support skills and widening their knowledge of the post-school possibilities available; and
  4. Increasing the professional development of teachers and the quality of schools.
Key message Choices + Guidance = My Future Plan
Australian National Curriculum general capabilities

The Australian Curriculum includes seven general capabilities:

  • Literacy
  • Numeracy
  • Information and communication technology (ICT) capability
  • Critical and creative thinking
  • Personal and social capability
  • Ethical understanding
  • Intercultural understanding.

General capabilities, a key dimension of the Australian Curriculum, are addressed explicitly in the content of the learning areas.

The general capabilities encompass the knowledge, skills, behaviours and dispositions that, together with curriculum content in each learning area and the cross-curriculum priorities, will assist students to live and work successfully in the twenty-first century.

For more information, access:

Progression options and key transition points
  • Retention
  • Achievement
  • Literacy and numeracy skills
  • School quality
NAPLAN

The National Assessment Program – Literacy and Numeracy (NAPLAN) is an annual assessment for students in Years 3, 5, 7 and 9.

For students in Year 7 there are five tests covering reading, writing and language conventions (spelling, punctuation and grammar), as well as two tests in numeracy (a calculator allowed and non-calculator test).

More information is available on the Board of Studies website and NAPLAN website.

Academic preparedness
  • Sustained holistic in-school programs aimed at increasing student skills, achievement and completion, raising aspirations, developing cultural capital, increasing student resilience and engaging parents in their children's education
Motivation, confidence and awareness
  • Diverse outreach which focuses on life-benefits of education, alternative pathways and aspirations for career progression.
Building school and community capacity
  • Professional development for teachers, including experiential training; focused on diversity, equity and improved capacity
  • Building a professional learning community which supports teachers, as well as parents and students
  • Develop and achievement focused culture within schools
Engaging parents and carers
  • Raising expectations of student achievement in parents / and raising the parent's own aspirations for education
  • Involving parents in educational committees and events;
  • Making regular contact through a variety of means, including face to face events and online communication
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples
  • Outreach focused engaging established Indigenous service providers, community groups and institutions in addition to schools
  • Enhancing a school's Indigenous and/or diversity curricular; via add-on programs, one-off events, teacher training, and/or community engagement of various kinds such as NAIDOC events
Page title Stage 5 - Years 9 and 10
Introduction text

As students move into Years Nine and Ten, they enter a phase of education that liberates them to make some choices and to pursue in greater depth some of the courses which they have enjoyed and done well at. At the same time students will continue to develop their knowledge and skills in courses which are compulsory requirements for progression to Year Eleven.

When making elective course choices, students are encouraged to bear in mind their experiences from Years Seven and Eight. For Years Nine and Ten, students' interests and abilities should be of prime consideration when making course choices. A broad, general and interesting choice of courses in which students feel confident will form the best basis for a rich and successful educational experience. At this stages students most immediate career progression goals are linked with their elective choices and information and guidance is and should be sought from teachers and parents.

Students will also at this stage consider the degree of intellectual challenge offered by subjects in finding the right balance between their immediate interests and longer term career goals. Programs offering preparation for students for career choices, extension subject progression and consideration of career paths would include:

  1. Raising educational aspirations, and improving practical knowledge of career options and university pathways;
  2. Engagement of children and parents in subject selection, linking to future career aspirations and goals;
  3. Engagement of parents in their children's education, particularly in strengthening parental expectations and support skills and widening their knowledge of the post-school possibilities available; and
  4. Increasing the professional development of teachers and the quality of schools.
Key message Choices + Guidance = My Future Plan
Record of student Achievement (RoSA)

Eligible students who leave school before receiving their Higher School Certificate (HSC) will receive the NSW Record of School Achievement (RoSA). This is a cumulative credential that allows students to accumulate their academic results for completed Stage 5 and Preliminary Stage 6 courses and grades, and participation in any uncompleted Preliminary Stage 6 courses.

More information is available on the ROSA website.

Australian National Curriculum general capabilities

The Australian Curriculum includes seven general capabilities:

  • Literacy
  • Numeracy
  • Information and communication technology (ICT) capability
  • Critical and creative thinking
  • Personal and social capability
  • Ethical understanding
  • Intercultural understanding.

General capabilities, a key dimension of the Australian Curriculum, are addressed explicitly in the content of the learning areas. The general capabilities encompass the knowledge, skills, behaviours and dispositions that, together with curriculum content in each learning area and the cross-curriculum priorities, will assist students to live and work successfully in the twenty-first century.

For more information, access:

Progression options and key transition points
  • Literacy and numeracy
  • Knowledge of potential educational and career paths
  • Aspiration in year 10
  • Career advice
NAPLAN

The National Assessment Program – Literacy and Numeracy (NAPLAN) is an annual assessment for students in Years 3, 5, 7 and 9.

For students in Year 9 there are five tests covering reading, writing and language conventions (spelling, punctuation and grammar), as well as two tests in numeracy (a calculator allowed and non-calculator test).

More information is available on the Board of Studies website and NAPLAN website.

Clusters
Academic preparedness
  • Sustained holistic in-school programs aimed at increasing student skills, achievement and completion, raising aspirations, developing cultural capital, increasing student resilience and engaging parents in their children's education
Motivation, confidence and awareness
  • Sustained, holistic university outreach programs aimed at students, peer groups and parents, which foster student engagement, raise interest in particular fields and provide information about university courses, financial resources, student services and career advice; via school visits by university staff and students, mentoring and on campus tasters
  • Diverse outreach which focuses on life benefits of education and alternative pathways
Building school and community capacity
  • Professional development for teachers, including experiential training; focused on diversity, equity and improved capacity
  • Building a professional learning community which supports teachers, as well as parents and students
  • Develop and achievement focused culture within schools
Engaging parents and carers
  • Providing parents with information about possible career paths, university courses and financial resources;
  • Raising expectations of student achievement in parents / and raising the parent's own aspirations for education
  • Involving parents in educational committees and events;
  • Consulting about the policies, events and initiatives
  • Making regular contact through a variety of means, including face to face events and online communication
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples
  • Outreach focused engaging established Indigenous service providers, community groups and institutions in addition to schools
  • Enhancing a school's Indigenous and/or diversity curricular; via add-on programs, one-off events, teacher training, and/or community engagement of various kinds such as NAIDOC events
  • Providing information on courses, careers, support and financial services online as well as face-to-face.
Page title Stage 6 - Years 11 and 12
Introduction text

Secondary school transition into higher education remains the most common path for students entering university. It is also the most common stage of pre-university education targeted by university led outreach programs, which focus on increasing the participation in higher education of students from low socio-economic backgrounds, Indigenous students, and regional and remote students.

Sustained, holistic or cumulative programs are considered best practice in increasing students' secondary school achievement and completion, and raising aspiration for further education.

Such programs generally have four main goals related to preparing students for higher education and career paths:

  1. Raising educational aspirations, and improving practical knowledge of career options and university pathways;
  2. Early engagement of students in order to develop their social, personal and cultural capital, and increase their university readiness, resilience and capacity;
  3. Engagement of parents in their children's education, particularly in strengthening parental expectations and support skills and widening their knowledge of the post-school possibilities available; and increasing the professional development of teachers and the quality of schools.
Key message

My Future plan + Pathways = Future Career

  • Harness inspirational messages from the Make Your Mark website:
    • Want to do something you Love?
    • Want to change the World?
    • Want to your own Boss?
  • Support actualisation of realistic career and future options outlined in My Future plan
  • Assist with activation of Career / job / HE applications identified in My Future plan
  • Facilitate pathways engagement and awareness of transition options
Record of School Achievement (RoSA)

Eligible students who leave school before receiving their Higher School Certificate (HSC) will receive the NSW Record of School Achievement (RoSA). This is a cumulative credential that allows students to accumulate their academic results for completed Stage 5 and Preliminary Stage 6 courses and grades, and participation in any uncompleted Preliminary Stage 6 courses.

More information is available on the ROSA website.

AQF learning outcomes

Senior Secondary Certificate of Education

The Senior Secondary Certificate of Education is graduation certificate awarded to most students in Australian High Schools to qualify individuals with knowledge, skills and values for diverse pathways to further learning, work and effective participation in civic life.

The AQF specification for the Senior Secondary Certificate of Education can be found on the AQF website.

Certificates / Diplomas

Certificates / Diplomas are basic post secondary qualifications and prepare students for both employment and further education and training:

  • AQF Level 1 – Certificate I qualifies individuals with basic functional knowledge and skills to undertake work, further learning and community involvement
  • AQF Level 2 – Certificate II qualifies individuals to undertake mainly routine work and as a pathway to further learning
  • AQF Level 3 – Certificate III qualifies individuals who apply a broad range of knowledge and skills in varied contexts to undertake skilled work and as a pathway for further learning
  • AQF Level 4 – Certificate IV qualifies individuals who apply a broad range of specialised knowledge and skills in varied contexts to undertake skilled work and as a pathway for further learning
  • AQF Level 5 – Diploma qualifies individuals who apply integrated technical and theoretical concepts in a broad range of contexts to undertake advanced skilled or paraprofessional work and as a pathway for further learning
  • AQF Level 6 – Advanced Diploma qualifies individuals who apply specialised knowledge in a range of contexts to undertake advanced skilled or paraprofessional work and as a pathway for further learning.

Further information is available on the AQF qualifications page.

Australian National Curriculum general capabilities

The NSW Board of Studies' Stage 6 syllabus describes the Preliminary and HSC courses to be taught within each subject that may be undertaken as part of the HSC pattern of study. All schools are required to deliver programs of study that comply with the requirements of Board syllabuses, including coverage of all the essential content of the Board's syllabuses.

More information on Board Developed courses are available at on the Board of Studies HSC Syllabus page.

English

  • English
  • HSC English Extension 1
  • HSC English Extension 2
  • English as a Second Language
  • Fundamentals of English

Mathematics

  • Mathematics General
  • Mathematics
  • Mathematics Extension 1
  • Mathematics Extension 2

Science

  • Biology
  • Chemistry
  • Earth and Environmental Science
  • Physics
  • Senior Science

HSIE (Human Society and Its Environment)

  • Aboriginal Studies
  • Ancient History
  • Business Studies
  • Economics
  • Geography
  • HSC History Extension
  • Legal Studies
  • Modern History
  • Society and Culture
  • Studies of Religion

PDHPE

  • Community and Family Studies
  • Personal Development, Health and Physical Education

Creative Arts

  • Dance
  • Drama
  • Music 1
  • Music 2 and Music Extension
  • Visual Arts

Technology

  • Agriculture
  • Design and Technology
  • Engineering Studies
  • Food Technology
  • Industrial Technology
  • Information Processes and Technology
  • Software Design and Development
  • Textiles and Design

Languages

  • Languages Background Speakers courses
  • Languages Beginners courses
  • Languages Continuers courses
  • Languages Extension courses
  • Heritage Language courses

VET Curriculum Frameworks

  • Automotive
  • Business Services
  • Construction
  • Electrotechnology
  • Entertainment Industry
  • Financial Services
  • Hospitality
  • Human Services
  • Information and Digital Technology
  • Metal and Engineering
  • Primary Industries
  • Retail Services
  • Tourism and Events
  • Tourism, Travel and Events

Life Skills Courses

  • Creative Arts Life Skills
  • Dance Life Skills
  • Drama Life Skills
  • Music Life Skills
  • Visual Arts Life Skills
  • Community and Family Studies Life Skills
  • English Life Skills
  • Human Society and Its Environment Life Skills
  • Aboriginal Studies Life Skills
  • Business and Economics Life Skills
  • Citizenship and Legal Studies Life Skills
  • Geography Life Skills
  • History Life Skills
  • Society and Culture Life Skills
  • Studies of Religion I Life Skills
  • Studies of Religion II Life Skills
  • Mathematics Life Skills
  • Personal Development, Health and Physical Education Life Skills
  • Science Life Skills
  • Technology Life Skills
  • Agriculture Life Skills
  • Design and Technology Life Skills
  • Food Technology Life Skills
  • Industrial Technology Life Skills
  • Information Processes and Technology Life Skills
  • Textiles and Design Life Skills
  • Work and the Community Life Skills

More information can be found at the Board of Studies' Board Content Endorsed Courses page and VET Content Endorsed Courses page.

Progression options and key transition points
  • Knowledge of specific university entry requirements, and support programs, including financial support
  • Completion and aspiration in years 11-12
Clusters
Academic preparedness
  • Sustained holistic in-school programs aimed at increasing student skills, achievement and completion, raising aspirations, developing cultural capital, increasing student resilience and engaging parents in their children's education
Motivation, confidence and awareness
  • Sustained, holistic university outreach programs aimed at students, peer groups and parents, which foster student engagement, raise interest in particular fields and provide information about university courses, financial resources, student services and career advice; via school visits by university staff and students, mentoring and on campus tasters
  • Diverse outreach which focuses on life benefits of education and alternative pathways
Building school and community capacity
  • Professional development for teachers, including experiential training; focused on diversity, equity and improved capacity
  • Building a professional learning community which supports teachers, as well as parents and students
  • Develop and achievement focused culture within schools
Engaging parents and carers
  • Providing parents with information about possible career paths, university courses and financial resources;
  • Raising expectations of student achievement in parents / and raising the parent's own aspirations for education
  • Involving parents in educational committees and events;
  • Consulting about the policies, events and initiatives
  • Making regular contact through a variety of means, including face to face events and online communication
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples
  • Outreach focused engaging established Indigenous service providers, community groups and institutions in addition to schools
  • Enhancing a school's Indigenous and/or diversity curricular; via add-on programs, one-off events, teacher training, and/or community engagement of various kinds such as NAIDOC events
  • Providing information on courses, careers, support and financial services online as well as face-to-face.

Tertiary Progression / Lifelong Learning and Mature Age

Tertiary Sector progression
Introduction text 

There are a wide variety of progression initiatives being undertaken within universities, focused around improving student engagement, support, retention and achievement; improving teaching, curriculum and assessment practices; and improving the equity of institutional processes and practices.

In addressing these drivers, university-based progression programs focus on six key areas:

  1. Pre-entry, induction, orientation and transition programs
  2. Academic interventions, both whole cohort and targeted
  3. Student support services
  4. Staff support, including professional development
  5. Institutional diversity-focused reforms, particularly of curriculum and institutional culture and processes; and
  6. Collaborative programs with other universities, communities and industry.
Key message:

Make Your Mark = Education is for you

  • Do something you love
  • Change the world
  • Be your own boss
AQF learning outcome

Special Tertiary Admissions Test

The Special Tertiary Admissions Test (STAT) is a series of tests designed to assess a range of competencies considered important for success in tertiary study. It assesses your ability to think critically and analyse the material given, rather than testing your knowledge or specific academic subjects.

STAT is used by many tertiary institutions in Australia as part of their admissions procedure for certain categories of applicants. STAT is used in addition to any other information available when assessing your application for admission. If you have no formal qualifications on which to base your application to a tertiary institution, you may be eligible to be considered for entry to a course by sitting STAT. Most institutions don't consider STAT results if you are a past year 12 students, however some courses require all applicants, including Year 12 students to sit STAT.

More information can be found on the UAC STAT page.

Certificates / Diplomas

Certificates / Diplomas are basic post secondary qualifications and prepare students for both employment and further education and training:

  • AQF Level 1 – Certificate I qualifies individuals with basic functional knowledge and skills to undertake work, further learning and community involvement
  • AQF Level 2 – Certificate II qualifies individuals to undertake mainly routine work and as a pathway to further learning
  • AQF Level 3 – Certificate III  qualifies individuals who apply a broad range of knowledge and skills in varied contexts to undertake skilled work and as a pathway for further learning
  • AQF Level 4 – Certificate IV qualifies individuals who apply a broad range of specialised knowledge and skills in varied contexts to undertake skilled work and as a pathway for further learning
  • AQF Level 5 – Diploma qualifies individuals who apply integrated technical and theoretical concepts in a broad range of contexts to undertake advanced skilled or paraprofessional work and as a pathway for further learning
  • AQF Level 6 – Advanced Diploma qualifies individuals who apply specialised knowledge in a range of contexts to undertake advanced skilled or paraprofessional work and as a pathway for further learning

Further information is available on the AQF Qualifications page.

Progression options and key transition points
  • Academic literacy and numeracy
  • Discipline-specific skills
  • Pre-entry preparation
  • First year transition
  • Student support services
  • Financial support
Clusters
Academic preparedness
  • Pre-entry and first year transition programs, which embed in the curriculum
  • Diagnostic instruments for academic skills
  • Core-skills development programs
  • Community building programs
  • Online pre-entry programs and information hubs
  • Student support services to improve academic literacy, numeracy, and discipline specific skills; plus a wide range of social services such as health care, pastoral care, and financial support
  • Learning centres which offer personalised tutoring or workshops in student skills
  • Targeted interventions for specific cohorts or at-risk students, including academically focused, financial and pastoral care programs
Motivation, confidence and awareness
  • Informal social and recreational programs which help students strengthen cultural capital, and develop a student identity;
  • Become integrated members of the learning community
  • Develop additional academic skills where needed
  • Embedded or stand-alone reflective practice programs
  • Peer mentor and peer assisted study programs
  • Assigned tutors / course advisors
  • Outreach to inform students of available services
Building school and community capacity
  • Building staff capacity through mandatory professional development focused on core student-focused and self-reflexive teaching skills
  • Professional development of teaching staff focused on developing awareness of social justice principles, and effective strategies related to fostering a respect for diversity in the classroom and other learning spaces
  • Student involvement in designing induction activities
  • Supporting student advisors with periodic whole cohort events
  • Online student / tutor management systems which enables tracking and transition
  • Work placement experiences for students, with a focus on developing career pathways
  • Curriculum reform, focused on social justice principles, commonly via surveys, focus groups or seeking feedback on proposed changes
Engaging parents and carers
  • Outreach incorporated into pre-entry aspirational programs and information services
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples
  • Expanding existing Indigenous Units and Centres within universities
  • Developing remote, satellite or shared university campuses, alongside blended learning modes and e-learning
  • Peer mentoring
  • Assigned tutors / course advisors
  • Work placement experiences for students, with a focus on developing career pathways.
Page title Pathways, transitions and lifelong learning
Introduction text

While transition from secondary school to university remains the most common pathway to higher education, there are an increasing number of later entrants who have arrived via alternative pathways, often as mature age students after a significant time away from formal education.

The main alternative entry pathways which university led progression programs target are currently:

  • Open University, which is as the name implies requires few, if any, prerequisites other than an ability to pay;
  • Enabling programs, which are well-established and effective; and
  • Pathways from VET courses.
Key message

Make Your Mark = Education is for you

  • Do something you love
  • Change the world
  • Be your own boss
Required knowledge and skills

Make Your Mark = Education is for you

  • Do something you love
  • Change the world
  • Be your own boss
Progression options and key transition points
  • Targeted tutoring or study support schemes at all levels of education
  • Student services, including financial support, at all levels of education
  • Alternative pathways to higher education, including alternatives to ATAR, and pathways leading from VET into university
  • Pathways to real post-school options
  • Availability of online education
Australian Qualifications Framework

Certificates / Diplomas

Certificates / Diplomas are basic post secondary qualifications and prepare students for both employment and further education and training:

  • AQF Level 1 – Certificate I qualifies individuals with basic functional knowledge and skills to undertake work, further learning and community involvement
  • AQF Level 2 – Certificate II qualifies individuals to undertake mainly routine work and as a pathway to further learning
  • AQF Level 3 – Certificate III  qualifies individuals who apply a broad range of knowledge and skills in varied contexts to undertake skilled work and as a pathway for further learning
  • AQF Level 4 – Certificate IV qualifies individuals who apply a broad range of specialised knowledge and skills in varied contexts to undertake skilled work and as a pathway for further learning
  • AQF Level 5 – Diploma qualifies individuals who apply integrated technical and theoretical concepts in a broad range of contexts to undertake advanced skilled or paraprofessional work and as a pathway for further learning
  • AQF Level 6 – Advanced Diploma qualifies individuals who apply specialised knowledge in a range of contexts to undertake advanced skilled or paraprofessional work and as a pathway for further learning.
Further information is available on the AQF Qualifications page.
Clusters
Academic preparedness

Enabling programs which:

  • Increase access via additional pathways
  • Prepare students for university study and offer a taster of the university experience
  • Holistic intervention programs focused on:
    • Tracking disengaged or at-risk students, and offering counselling and / or referring them to appropriate student services;
    • Teaching time management skills and/or developing a more flexible curriculum;
    • Improving opportunities for social interaction with peers, and providing frequent and timely feedback; and
    • Embedding support services within the program, and / or raising awareness of services
  • Student support services to improve academic literacy, numeracy and discipline – specific skills, plus a wide range of social services such as health care, pastoral care and financial support.
Motivation, confidence and awareness
  • Peer mentoring
  • Outreach to mature age and later entry students
  • Giving learners some control over the online environment, including individualised elements, which depend on the student's responses
Building school and community capacity
  • Work based learning programs with a focus on developing career pathways
  • Dual sector pathways, which offer dedicated and structured pathways, specific admission policies, easy credit transfer, clear and comprehensive information and career counselling
  • Cross institutional tracking and intervention programs
  • Development of blended and fully online e-learning pathways
  • Professional development of teaching staff focused on developing awareness social justice principles, and effective strategies related to fostering a respect for diversity in the classroom, and in effective e-learning delivery
Engaging parents and carers
  • Childcare
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples
  • University enabling programs
  • Creating additional transition and access pathways for Indigenous students, which collaborative link schools, VET and university
  • Online local language resources, learner generated media, such as e-portfolios, and social networking
  • Developing specific pedagogy and curricula aimed at engaging Indigenous students, in consultation with the local community
  • Work based learning programs, with a focus on developing career pathways
  • Career counselling
  • Peer mentoring

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